Daily Digest (5/26)

Dutch Judge Orders Grandmother to Remove Photos From Social Media; Canadian Spy Agency Warns Against Changes in Privacy Law; US State Legislator Introduces Bill to Protect Privacy as Contact-Tracing Begins. Click “Continue reading” below.

Dutch Judge Orders Grandmother to Remove Photos From Social Media

A Dutch court has ruled that a woman violated the EU’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) after she refused to take down pictures of her grandchildren from Facebook and Pinterest.

A Circuit Court judge in the province of Gelderland, in the eastern part of the Netherlands, decided this month that the grandmother could not post photos of her three grandchildren without the permission of her daughter, the children’s mother, The New York Times reports.

Neither woman was named in court documents, but the case apparently evolved from a family dispute last year, according to the report.

Under GDPR rules in the Netherlands, posting pictures of minors under 16 requires permission from legal guardians. The children’s mother filed suit after her mother refused to delete the photos from the sites.

The judge directed the grandmother to delete the photos within 10 days. For every day thereafter, she could incur a fine of $54.

“This is, to my knowledge, the first case ever in which the GDPR is used to adjudicate a family dispute,” Dutch lawyer Arnoud Engelfriet told the Times. “This law gives private individuals cause of action against both companies, governments and individuals that violate their privacy.

“We rarely see this in action due to the costs involved, but it is certainly possible.”

Source (external link): Grandmother’s Refusal to Remove Photos From Facebook Tests Privacy Law

Canadian Spy Agency Warns Against Changes in Privacy Law

The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) warned the government that proposed changes to the Privacy Act could “significantly impact the work of national security and investigative agencies,” Global News reports.

The law’s broad definition of “personal information” raised concerns, CSIS said in a 14-page report to the Canadian Justice Department. It also argued that any changes to the law should ensure that it is not required to disclose the foreign agencies it shares data with.

In addition, the spy agency contended that it should be exempt from informing individuals that their data had been breached.

“I note that some of the changes proposed in the papers could significantly impact the work of national security and investigative agencies, including CSIS,” wrote the spy service’s director, David Vigneault, in his cover letter to the report.

Source (external link): Proposed federal privacy changes could set back spy operations, CSIS warns

US State Legislator Introduces Bill to Protect Privacy as Contact-Tracing Begins

Louisiana Republican state Rep. Raymond Crews has introduced legislation to citizen privacy rights as contact-tracing begins to document the spread of COVID-19.

The Louisiana Department of Health (LDH) has hired tracers to call people who have been in contact with someone diagnosed with coronavirus, local station KATC-TV News reports.

Tracers are to ask about symptoms, when individuals got tested and who they’ve been in contact with.

LDH officials say tracers “will never identify you, share your name or your health information.”

But Crews’ resolution directs Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards to further ensure the “liberty and individual rights of Louisiana citizens” as the process gets underway.

Source (external link): Resolution urges state to ensure patient privacy as contact tracing begins

— By DPN Staff